News

House panel endorses bill on executions

LITTLE ROCK — A House committee gave a “do pass” recommendation Thursday to a bill that would give victims’ families more say in who is allowed to witness executions.

Committee names choice for ADHE director

LITTLE ROCK — The Arkansas Department of Higher Education’s Director Search Committee has decided to recommend Brett Powell as the next director of ADHE, the agency said Thursday.

Cotton backs more sanctions against Iran

WASHINGTON — The Senate Banking Committee on Thursday advanced legislation that would ratchet up sanctions against Iran if it fails to agree to strict limits on its nuclear program.

Sports

Anderson, Hogs Want Win in Return to Mizzou

FAYETTEVILLE — Mike Anderson measures his words. They don’t sound planned most of the game as he’s an amiable guy, easy to talk to. But when he’s talking about Missouri, his former school, those words are certainly deliberate.

Van Horn Addresses Questions As Practice Begins

FAYETTEVILLE - Just more than six months after the Arkansas baseball season ended at the hands of national runner-up Virginia, coach Dave Van Horn and the Razorbacks were back on the Baum Stadium field preparing for a return trip to the NCAA Tournament.

Opinion

Editorial: MLK a clarion for service

As the nation honors the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. we should pause to reflect on his ideals and vision for America. We all know King’s work in the cause of civil rights, but his call for committed public service should also be remembered.

Editorial: Congress could stand to repeal many laws

John Adams held dear the belief that our nation should possess “a government of laws and not of men.” Mr. Adams shared Aristotle’s belief that “law should govern,” and wrote that “it is the duty of the people, therefore, in framing a constitution of government, to provide for an equitable mode of making laws, as well as for an impartial interpretation and a faithful execution of them; that every man may, at all times, find his security in them.”

Pate: Hidden in plain sight

It may seem an odd parallel, but there exists an interesting relationship between the judicial evolution of obscenity and changing sensibilities regarding police use of force. The comparison suggested itself as I read an article on James Joyce’s landmark tome, Ulysses. Eighty-one years ago this week, a federal magistrate ruled that the book was not obscene.

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